Tag Archives: sex

The Day of the Dolphins—A Life of Orgies

From Vanity Fair (hat tip: Instapundit, with the comment, “Now we know why dolphins always look like they’re smiling.”):

As for the fabled orgy, it turns out that dolphins are one of the most promiscuous animals on the planet. They don’t mate just for reproduction. They enjoy sex. It’s a social binder for them, like a handshake. On a good day a dolphin can have sex 50 times. Dolphins do it with everyone . . . old, young, big, small, even family members. Homosexual behavior is common, as is masturbation; dolphins have even been known to make advances at human beings. The dark side of the dolphin—the turd in the superpod—is that sometimes dolphin sex can be violent and nonconsensual. Rape and gang rape happens. We did not see any of that, though. This seemed to be a law-abiding lot.

 

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Good sex in literature: why is it so hard to find?

From The Guardian:

Julian Barnes claims that British novelists feel obligated to write love scenes and so make a hash of it, replacing euphemisms with cliches. So what is so tricky about literary sex?

Since I am writing my next book, a mystery that includes murder, mayhem and sex, I was struck by this article. Yes, literary sex is tricky….

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‘Best literary sex scenes: writers’ favourites’

From The Guardian, thus the British spelling of “favorites.”This, of course, is a “hot” topic in the wake of Fifty Shades of Grey. (Hat tip: Frank Wilson)

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Slavoj Žižek: ‘Humanity is OK, but 99% of people are boring idiots’

From The Guardian:

A genius with the answers to the financial crisis? Or the Borat of philosophy? The cultural theorist talks about love, sex and why nothing is ever what it appears to be

The “Borat of philosophy” is possibly one of the best descriptions ever written. He’s also “incurably romantic” and a “complicated Marxist.”

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How to Write Romance Novels

I don’t plan to ever write a romance novel, but here is a very funny piece by Chris Braiotta from the hairpin (Hat tip mental_floss magazine) on the formula for doing that:

Women like you have two dreams in this world. The first is a pair of ferocious boots that say “Sarah Michelle Gellar speaking crossly to a Sudanese rebel.” The second is a successful, secret career as a romance novelist. That first dream of yours kind of creeps me out, but the second one is something I can help with. It turns out that writing romance novels is very, very easy as long as you follow the rules. In my role as friend to women, I’m going to tell you about those rules, and illustrate how I followed those rules with actual, incredible prose.

To start, you need to introduce your heroine. She needs to be relatable, so don’t give her too many qualities.

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Review—The Accomplices by Simenon

The Accomplices, by Simenon

It opens with a terrible bus accident at a dangerous curve in the rain…“just enough [rain] to cover the asphalt with a sticky film.” The place was known as the Big Hill. The bus full of Parisian summer camp children crashes and burns with only one survivor. Lambert had heard the bus horn behind him, not realizing he was driving in the middle of the road.

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‘Being a prude in a family of libertines’

From Salon, Molly Jong-Fast says, “My mother is famous for writing about women and sex. Why did I choose a life so different from hers?” An excerpt:

My mother fought for free love and the right to sexual expression. I fight the traffic as I squire my kids up and down Madison Avenue. Both sets of my grandparents had open marriages. I have a closed marriage (that’s where you only sleep with the person you are married to). My mother’s mother tells stories of sleeping with my grandfather in the woods and smoking “grass.” There are not a lot of woods where I live in Manhattan. If it is every generation’s job to swing the pendulum back, then I have done mine.

 

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Dark Desires

This NPR book review of the confessional Dark Desires and the Others, written by Luisa Valenzuela, is titled Sex, Submission, and ‘Dark Desires.’ It’s interesting. The reviewer says,

It’s a little self-indulgent, perhaps, and rambling, too. But Dark Desiresdoes rub up against an uncomfortable truth that began to emerge in the late 1970s and early 1980s, around the time her notebooks were originally written: Women were suddenly finding success in work and business, but were failing at love. Valenzuela could be a case study in Female Perversions, Louise Kaplan’s groundbreaking Freudian study of this phenomenon. Women who felt powerful in their chosen professions were, in their love and sex lives, willfully subjugating themselves to their male partners.

Sometimes, there is simply nothing further to say.

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Review—Hating Olivia, by Mark SaFranko

Every book I read these days is an opportunity for me to evaluate writing styles. And when I think back on all the crime thrillers, suspense novels, and noir fiction that I’ve enjoyed over the years, it’s the punchy dialog, the brevity of words, and “the short declarative sentences,” as in reference to Hemingway, that I liked. This was often coupled with poetic prose that gave these books a contrasting feel—where one can get a sense of the author’s soul.

I’ve only recently been introduced to authors John Fante and Charles Bukowski, and although their subjects are depressing, they’re style is somewhat similar. It’s unfair to say that Mark SaFranko’s Hating Olivia is exactly like them, but as Dan Fante, son of John Fante, said in the introduction, “Hating Olivia is fresh meat, a gift tied together with a bloodstained bow.”

There’s another thing: Mr. SaFanko has written a “hundred short stories, fifty of them already in print. A box full of poetry and essays. And ten complete novels, eight of them yet to hit the bookshelves. A dozen plays, some produced in New York and others staged in Ireland. SaFranko writes songs too, a hundred and fifty so far.” So, unpublished old guy that I am, I’m intimidated before I’ve finished the introduction!

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