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Category Archive for 'Authors'

From Slate—the introductory paragraph: Dickens! Should’st be living at this hour and should’st be writing for Slate and publishing fiction online. The world needs vivid laughter, wider vision. Even just to recall the names of characters—Smike, Scrooge, Guppy, Copperfield, Nell—is to wake to lost possibilities of what novels can reach and do. All our talk of the [...]

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On PD James

From the Guardian: On entering her 10th decade last year, PD James – legend of crime writing and creator of Adam Dalgliesh, one of Britain’s best-loved fictional sleuths – decided that the time had come to have some fun. Disinclined, at 90, to begin another Dalgliesh novel, on the grounds that to die leaving a manuscript unfinished [...]

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Vonnegut in All His Complexity

From the New York Times: Charles J. Shields got nowhere with Harper Lee when he tried to interview her for the 2006 biography “Mockingbird.” But he got lucky withKurt Vonnegut. Mr. Shields found a lonely talkative octogenarian who had scores to settle and a reputation that badly needed restoring. Vonnegut had once told Martin Amis [...]

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On Thomas Pynchon

The article is titled, “Meet your neighbor, Thomas Pynchon.” He’s not exactly my neighbor, since he lives in New York City, but the article from the November 11, 1996 issue of New York Magazine is interesting nonetheless: While scholars speculated that he had lost his mind, or taken to the road, the world’s most successful media [...]

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‘Never Kick a Dick’

From the San Francisco Chronicle, Long-Lost Cornell Woolrich story republished: A long-lost Cornell Woolrich story, with a rhyming title that seems destined to become a catch-phrase, is being published this week. The Strand Magazine will reintroduce a short thriller by the author whose fiction was the source for such classic films as Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window” [...]

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On Pete Dexter

Pete Dexter is the author of several novels, most notably, National Book Award–winning Paris Trout (1988), “a riveting tale of an unrepentant racist who brutally murders a 14-year-old black girl in a small Georgia town in the late 1940s,” and Deadwood (1986), turned into a gritty HBO series. At the link is a Village Voice article  called Let It [...]

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Okay, I have to read this author—Books: The Great Leader, by Jim Harrison—found at GuelphMercury.com. The hook? He might cringe at the thought, but Harrison is both a moral and a spiritual writer who sees decency in living honestly and holiness in the pleasures of the flesh. Copyright secured by Digiprove © 2011 James Ament Bookmark on Delicious Digg this post Recommend [...]

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Norman Mailer’s True Fiction

From the New Yorker, Norman Mailer’s True Fiction, by Richard Brody: There’s a superb and insightful piece about Norman Mailer by Jonathan Lethem at the Los Angeles Review of Books (that site is one of the instant jewels of the Internet). Lethem starts off by discussing his own lifelong love for Mailer’s writing and fascination with Mailer’s [...]

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Philip Marlowe’s Bad Idea

From Today in Literature: On this day in 1958 Raymond Chandler began his last novel, the never-completed (by him) Poodle Springs. This was Chandler’s name for Palm Springs, where “every third elegant creature you see has at least one poodle,” and where Philip Marlowe thought he might settle down with his new wife, the socialite Linda [...]

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6 Things Learned From Charles Bukowski

From Huffington Post, 6 things I Learned from Charles Bukowski by James Altucher: Charles Bukowski was disgusting, his actual real fiction is awful, he’s been called a misogynist, overly simplistic, the worst narcissist, (and probably all of the above are true to an extent) and whenever there’s a collection of “Greatest American Writers” he’s never included. [...]

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